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TAKHZYRO is a prescription medicine used to prevent attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE) in people 12 years of age and older. It is not known if TAKHZYRO is safe and effective in children under 12 years of age.

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TAKHZYRO is a prescription medicine used to prevent attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE) in people 12 years of age and older. It is not known if TAKHZYRO is safe and effective in children under 12 years of age.

TAKHZYRO Side
Effects

Any time you’re considering a new treatment, it’s important to understand the possible risks and benefits.

A real TAKHZYRO® patient, Kelly with her partner and caregiver, Scott by a lake.
Kelly
Scott
Scott
Kelly

Talk to your doctor about possible TAKHZYRO side effects

TAKHZYRO may cause serious side effects, including allergic reactions. Call your doctor or get emergency help right away if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • wheezing
  • difficulty breathing
  • chest tightness
  • fast heartbeat
  • faintness
  • rash
  • hives

The most common side effects of TAKHZYRO are:

  • injection site reactions
    (pain, redness, and bruising)
  • upper respiratory infections
  • headache

These are not all the possible side effects of TAKHZYRO.

For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist.

Most common side effects in the 6.5-month clinical study
TAKHZYRO
(84 people)*
Placebo
(41 people)
Injection site reactions
52%
34%
Pain
43%
29%
Redness
10%
2%
Bruising
7%
0%
Upper respiratory infection
29%
32%
Headache
21%
22%
Rash
7%
5%
Muscle pain
5%
0%
Dizziness
6%
0%
Diarrhea
5%
5%

*Included all people treated with TAKHZYRO (300 mg every 2 weeks, 300 mg every 4 weeks, or 150 mg every 4 weeks) in the first study.

All side effects in both studies occurred in ≥10% of people taking TAKHZYRO.

The most common side effects seen in the long-term, open-label study were injection site reactions (including pain, redness, and bruising), upper respiratory infections, and headache.

Most common side effects in the 2.5-year, long-term, open-label study
TAKHZYRO 300 mg every 2 weeks (212 people)
Injection site pain
47%
Viral upper respiratory tract infection
42%
Upper respiratory tract infection
26%
Headache
25%
Injection site redness
17%
Joint pain
13%
Injection site bruising
12%
Back pain
12%
Diarrhea
11%
Sinus infection
11%
Influenza
10%
Nausea
10%
Urinary tract infection
10%

All side effects in both studies occurred in ≥10% of people taking TAKHZYRO.

Before you use TAKHZYRO, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. It is not known if TAKHZYRO can harm your unborn baby.
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if TAKHZYRO passes into your breastmilk. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby while using TAKHZYRO.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription medicines, over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements.

The safety and efficacy of TAKHZYRO were studied in one of the largest preventive trials in hereditary angioedema (HAE).

See study info

How did you decide TAKHZYRO was the right preventive treatment for you?

View Transcript

SCOTT: I did a lot of research. I read up on the studies of TAKHZYRO and learned about its effectiveness in helping to prevent HAE attacks. Having that information really helped me make the decision to try TAKHZYRO.

DENNIS: My doctor told me about TAKHZYRO, and my wife and I did some research. At the end of the day, I trust that my medical team and what they told me. After discussing the potential risks and the possibility of fewer HAE attacks, we decided it was the right treatment to take. And it's definitely made a big difference for me. I'm glad I listened.

KELLY: Seeing the clinical data and how effective TAKHZYRO was got my attention. It told me that this is a clinically proven treatment to help prevent HAE attacks, and that gave me the confidence to start.

JACK: For me, taking TAKHZYRO once every two weeks means it's not something I need to think about often. Plus, it's subcutaneous, which means it's injected under the skin, not in the vein. That feels manageable for me.

ANDREW: The actual injection takes about a minute, and then I'm free from thinking about my next dose for a few weeks.

SORAYA: I can inject myself, and it takes about a minute. It's an important thing I can do for myself to help reduce the frequency and severity of my HAE attacks.

NARRATOR: TAKHZYRO (lanadelumab) is a prescription medicine used to prevent attacks of hereditary angioedema, HAE, in people 12 years of age and older. It is not known if TAKHZYRO is safe and effective in children under 12 years of age. TAKHZYRO may cause serious side effects, including allergic reactions. Call your healthcare provider or get emergency help right away if you have any of the following symptoms: wheezing, difficulty breathing, chest tightness, fast heartbeat, faintness, rash, and/or hives.

NARRATOR: The most common side effects seen with TAKHZYRO were injection site reactions, pain, redness, and bruising; upper respiratory infection; and headache. These are not all the possible side effects of TAKHZYRO. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. TAKHZYRO has not been studied in pregnant or breastfeeding women. Talk to your healthcare provider about the risk of taking TAKHZYRO if you are pregnant, plan to be pregnant, are breastfeeding, or plan to breastfeed.

NARRATOR: Talk to your healthcare provider about TAKHZYRO, the only preventive HAE treatment you take as a subcutaneous injection just once every two weeks.

Ask your doctor about TAKHZYRO. You can even make a discussion guide to take to your next doctor's appointment.

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